Dyeing Your Hair Blonde: What to Avoid

I love having some sort of blonde in my hair whether it’s highlights or a full color.

Now that spring has sprung, ladies everywhere are looking to lighten their strands.

But before taking the platinum plunge, it’s important to know what to do, in order to ensure your color looks natural and hair stays healthy.
Dyeing your hair blonde comes with its challenges.

Here are some tips if you’re thinking about making a switch to the lighter side.


Open up to your colorist


When you go to a salon to make the big change, make sure your colorist knows everything about your hair history.
Let your colorist know if you’ve already dyed your hair before, how often you color it, what colors you’ve dyed your hair etc. - coloring previously colored hair and virgin hair is different.

When people dye their hair, months later the previous color is actually still in the hair. So if you were light in the summer and went darker in the fall, the colorist needs to be prepared for any orange and red tones from the previous hair dye.


Deepen the roots


You want to make sure your roots are darker than your ends so the color looks natural and grows out nicely.
The ends should be a little lighter than the root area, otherwise the color can look too artificial and not natural.
My favorite reason for Balayage highlights!

Wrong box color


If you are dyeing your hair blonde at home, choose the box color you want to go with very carefully – because what you see isn’t always what you get (I know from experience)!
Don’t rely on the picture of the model on the box, it can be misleading.

Instead, focus on the words used to describe the shade.

Colors described as:
Ash is good for people looking to combat brassiness.
Golden will incorporate more yellow tones and are great for people looking to conceal grey hair.
Violet in it will have purple tones.
Neutral can mean several different things, but usually implies a blue base to the shade.


Take a break from heat styling


After you make a color change, you’ll need to give your hair a break.
Usually hair that’s been lightened generally is done with a little bit of bleach and bleach plus heat from a blow dryer, flat iron or curling iron will cause breakage.
For example: When I straighten my bang section I’ll go over the front sections over and over, so that’s always the area I find breakage happens.

Use a purple Shampoo or Conditioner


It may look scary to put a purple product all over your light hair, but trust me, it works.
This helps neutralize yellow-orange brassy tones, which can occur from washing your hair, environmental stressors and naturally.
I recommend using a purple shampoo or conditioner once a week to combat that unwanted brassy look.
I am a huge fan of John Frieda products. So here is my favorite shampoo and conditioner.
John Frieda Sheer Blonde Color Renew Tone Restoring Shampoo brightens the hair color while reducing the brassiness.
This conditioner isn’t purple but has the same benefits. John Frieda Sheer Blonde Highlight Activating Enhancing Conditioner uses Natural lemon peel, chamomile and sunflower seed to brighten the hair. It also brings out highlights while maintaining brassiness and renews hair to a silky texture.

Is there ever any chance of hair turning purple from Purple shampoos or conditioners?

It’s possible, but very rare.
On really light, white blonde hair, you could end up lilac but it’s a very temporary.


Colored hair is dry hair


No matter what color you choose to dye your hair, the ends will end up dryer than before, especially the case for blondes.
People also underestimate how summertime activities, like swimming in the pool and ocean, can dry out your hair.
Using a deep conditioner or mask in at least once a week will help with the dry ends.

Eva NYC Therapy Sessions Hair Mask has Keravis protein and Argan oil to help deep condition the hair. I like that it repairs and strengthens the hair.
If you don’t have 20 minutes to do a hair mask, leave your conditioner on for one or two minutes longer than usual especially on the dry parts.




Are you thinking of going blonde for spring and summer? 


~Jennifer